stayweird

stayweird:

whitepeoplemadatthings:

WARNING: In this video, you will see a man shot to death from a distance of 50 to 100 feet.

I’m really, really sorry. I normally wouldn’t post something this graphic, but I feel that the world needs to understand what the people of Ferguson are dealing with.

The man who was killed, Kajiemi Powell, was obviously at least emotionally unbalanced (you can hear him shouting “shoot me” repeatedly at the cops after they draw their guns—which they do almost immediately, since, you know, people who steal two cans of soda are among the most dangerous of petty criminals), but you can see that he poses no obvious threat. They kill him while he’s merely pacing around their perimeter. There were other ways of dealing with this situation, but because the cops don’t value black lives, they didn’t care enough to even consider them. Hell, they exit the car with their guns drawn. Because he stole two sodas.

I don’t even know what to say about this. It’s awful. I didn’t want to watch it. But it needs to be seen to dismantle the “the cops’ lives were in danger” narrative. That narrative is quite clearly bullshit.

It goes without saying that unless you want to really lose your shit, you shouldn’t venture into the comment thread on this video’s Youtube page. There’s some really nasty racism going on over there.

your life is worth 2 cans of sodas.

priceofliberty
thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.